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Wednesday, September 13

  1. page Trial Feedback edited 2016-2017 2015/6 Oculus Rift {oculus example.png} {naace impact.jpg} This is a wiki an a…

    2016-20172015/6 Oculus Rift
    {oculus example.png} {naace impact.jpg}
    This is a wikian archived site that gives information on using virtual reality headsets with pupils with special needs.now as the trial is over and the consumer version of the Oculus Rift is also out now- making the development kit redundant. It is
    What is Virtual Reality?
    Virtual Reality (VR)- is using technology to create an immersive world or experience. This site gives a detailed overview of the whole general topic. We've been using the Oculus Rift VR Dev2 headset which runs with a PC since January 2015. With the headset on you can 'see' the other world all around you as you move your head.
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    It has also been used with a teenage girl with an Aspergers diagnosis and she was amazed with it at first, looking round, reaching out and commenting. Then she asked what else I had for it and while on an Island exploration program she took to the mouse pad control to move her view point and directional keys really easily. She also loved the rollercoaster programs, I kept asking her if her stomach felt okay (because mine goes into knots on them!) but she said she felt fine all the way through. I encouraged breaks in between each program as we chose the next one to use. In the same way one of our more able boys has been on it a few times- most recently with the Xbox controller- and he thinks it is awesome- a quote was 'Well, I never thought I'd see this!' as he flew around in a Star Wars space battle. He also reported no sickness or dizziness.
    What is the Oculus Rift?
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    in 2014 first as a Development2 kit- which means it is not 'available in the shops' and there's not much commercial software for it yet- it's for programmers to try out and make content for. But- it is very close to the finished product and there are many examples of programs out already. It costs about £350 and you can get it from the Oculus main website.development kit. The proper consumer version is outwas released in April 2016.2017.
    Basically it is a headset plugged into your computer that you wear over your eyes. Inside are two screens- one for each eye and these combine to give the impression that you can 'see' another world- a 'Virtual Reality'. Another camera attached to the computer then watches how your head is moving so you can look around this world and it moves accordingly- you can look around objects, under tables and also 'walk' forward- usually by tilting the head or using the keyboard or a controller.
    This is what the PC screen looks like- one oval for each 'eye' inside the Oculus- but with the headset on it looks like the real world.
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    It's not for the total beginner but it's not all that advanced either- it's in development stage- so if you want it easy then wait for the commercial version to come out in April, this will cost $599.00 but consider also the computer to run it- it needs to be a high spec computer costing around £1,300.00
    Other VR Headsets:
    The Oculus Rift Dev Kit is the only one you can really get your hands on now but The HTC Vive headset, is coming out Spring 2016, asnow out- it is similar in use to the Oculus. The Playstation has a VR headset.headset too- this works with Playstation consoles and not PC's. There areis also a lot of 'slot your phone in' ones like Google Cardboard that use a mobile phone to play the content- so. These are much easier
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    cheaper but they are not athe same total immersive environment.environment that you get with the Oculus and Vive headsets.
    Programs (information now out of date- see Oculus main site for the program content)
    These run like any other programs but are especially written for the Oculus Rift. There are loads of free ones to download on the Oculus VR website, some are better than others and some run only in extended mode- which is tricky to set up- so all of these programs should work straight away in what's called 'Direct Mode' which means one click and it appears in the headset ready to play. I've been through pretty much ALL of them and the ones on the pages below are the best for our pupils.
    There seems to be three main types of use to us in an SEN environment- click for reviews of them:
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    4:50 am

Monday, September 11

  1. page Home edited ... Virtual Reality and Special Needs This wiki site gives information on using virtual reality h…
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    Virtual Reality and Special Needs
    This wiki site gives information on using virtual reality headsets with pupils with special needs. It is part of a larger site looking at using emerging gesture based technology with special needs pupils. Click here to go to the main Gesture Technology page. This site is currently run by Anthony Rhys who teaches at Trinity Fields School in Ystrad Mynach, Caerphilly (Wales, UK).
    Our initial school trial was
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    on here.
    Now

    GETTING STARTED IN SCHOOL
    The Oculus Rift development kit was great, but it was just that, a development kit for developers. Now
    our school
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    Rift kit. The headset looks like this:
    {http://multimedia.bbycastatic.ca/multimedia/products/500x500/104/10460/10460569.jpg} Image result for oculus rift
    It retails at around £500. The problem is you need a high specification PC to run it. Ours cost around £1,300. Plus we've bought the Oculus Controllers, which set you back another few hundred. The expense can be worth it though as the controllers enable the player to see their hands in real time for some games.
    {https://www.vrheads.com/sites/vrheads.com/files/styles/xlarge/public/field/image/2016/06/touch-controller-oculusrift-accessories-01.jpg?itok=O5uWpxMp} Image result for oculus rift

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    8:14 am
  2. tag_del Home untagged VR autism
    8:08 am
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  4. page Home edited Virtual Reality and Special Needs This wiki site gives information on using virtual reality hea…

    Virtual Reality and Special Needs
    This wiki site gives information on using virtual reality headsets with pupils with special needs. It is part of a larger site looking at using emerging gesture based technology with special needs pupils. Click here to go to the main Gesture Technology page. This site is currently run by Anthony Rhys who teaches at Trinity Fields School in Ystrad Mynach, Caerphilly (Wales, UK).
    Our initial trial was with the Oculus Rift DEV2 kit in 2015-2016. Read about how we got on here.
    Now our school has the commercial Oculus Rift kit.

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    8:07 am
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